Archive for the ‘Boys & Girls Club’ Category

 

A distinguished panel of judges has selected a Salvation Army Central Oklahoma Boys & Girls Club member to be a part of Boys & Girls Clubs of America’s 2012 ImageMakers National Photography Contest.

Najahahn Jenkins’ photos Ghost” & “See Through in the Alternative and Digital categories respectively were selected along with 18 other photographs as a winner of the ImageMakers National Photography Contest from thousands submitted by aspiring young artists in Clubs and Youth Centers across the nation.

Josh Huling heads up the ImageMakers Program at The Salvation Army Boys & Girls Club in Central Oklahoma.

“I am thrilled that Najahahn’s creativity and dedication are being recognized on a national level,” said Megan Brown-Ellis, unit director for The Salvation Army Boys & Girls Club. “I am equally proud of Josh Huling and his now multi-award winning photography program.”

The ImageMakers National Photography Contest winners will be displayed at various Boys & Girls Clubs of America conferences and will be viewed by hundreds of conference delegates throughout the year.

”We aren’t surprised at the level of talent our kids have at the Club,” said Richard White, executive director of the Boys & Girls Club. “Najahahn is one of the shining stars of Josh Huling’s photography program at the Club. We are very proud of his accomplishments and that he will represent The Salvation Army Boys & Girls Club on a national basis.”

A plaque and letter from Jim Clark, president and CEO of Boys & Girls Clubs of America will be presented to Jenkins.  In addition, the image will be placed on bgca.org in the virtual gallery for viewing in the future.

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We’re flipping out! The annual Salvation Army Central Oklahoma Area Command Home Energy Aid Pancake Breakfast at the Mason Myrtle Lodge was a HUGE SUCCESS! We had hundreds arrive for those fluffy flapjacks and sausage that the Mason’s cooked, and ONG, OG&E and PSO volunteers also helped out.

 

Here’s a fun little slideshow from the event. Thanks to YOU, more families will receive much-needed and desperate aid to help with utility costs.

football

The Salvation Army Central Oklahoma Area Command Boys & Girls Club will host the 2nd Annual Football Camp, hosted by S.W.I.F.T (Students with Integrity, Fundamentals and Tenacity.)

The camp will be held from 6 to 8:30 p.m. July 9 – 12 at the Boys & Girls Club, 2808 S.E. 44th for ages 9 to 18. The camp is free to all children in the metropolitan area, but spots are limited to 150.

Registration for the free football camp begins Monday, June 25. To register, call Myron Mosely at 405-677-4781, Ext. 106.

S.W.I.F.T celebrity coaches for the football camp include former University of Oklahoma cornerback Mike Woods, former OU wide receiver Quentin Chaney, former OU linebacker Rufus Alexander, former University of Tulsa running back Tarrion Adams and former TU fullback Cody Madison.

In addition to running drills and working on football fundamentals during the week, the youth in the camp will also hear from special celebrity speakers about such topics as integrity, tenacity and learning the fundamentals.

“This camp is a fun week for youth interested in football, but it offers so much more,” said Coach Mosely. “Yes, they will run drills and learn technique, but S.W.I.F.T will also show them the importance of character in sports.”

S.W.I.F.T aims to impact metro youth with positive activities, like sports camps.

Again, registration is limited to 150 children. Registration for the camp begins Monday. Call Myron Mosely at 405-677-4781, ext. 106.

For more information about The Salvation Army Boys & Girls Club, contact Megan Brown-Ellis at 405-677-4781.

For the neediest children in Oklahoma County, the simple joys of a childhood summer may seem unattainable. These at-risk kids will spend their summer wandering the streets or hanging out with other idle kids… a recipe for trouble.

But The Salvation Army Central Oklahoma Area Command helps struggling local families avoid such an outcome for their children as The Salvation Army Central Oklahoma’s Boys & Girls Club summer day camp is in full swing.

The summer day camp, held from 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday at the Boys and Girls Club, 2808 SE 44th, runs through July 27. Already, more than 100 youth attend the club every day for activities like sports, outdoor recreation, computer lab, arts and crafts, reading, games and sports league practice.

Once a week, the youth also go to Eagle Harbor swimming pool and the Oklahoma City Boathouse, where they play on the playground and skate while the teens explore kayaking and canoeing.

“We are excited because we had full enrollment by May of this year for our summer camp,” said Megan Brown-Ellis, director of The Salvation Army Central Oklahoma Boys & Girls Club. “We have more than 80 children ages 6 to 11 years old as well as two teen programs, Club Teen and Junior Staff.”

Several other special events are slated for the June summer camp. These include:

  • June 6 – Tobacco Prevention      Program from the Oklahoma City-County Health Department in the morning
  • June 8 – Health Fair with      Oklahoma City Health and Wellness in the afternoon
  • June 11 – 15: Vacation      Bible School through Child Evangelism Fellowship
  • June 19 – New View      Blindness Awareness designed to show children what it’s like to be blind      and how to assist blind Americans through hands-on activities.
  • June 20 – 22: OKC Barons      Hockey camp all day at the Club
  • June 26 – 27: Girl Scouts      from 10 to 11 a.m.

“Many of our children at camp are at-risk and qualify for free and reduced lunches. We have a much higher percentage of foster kids and single parent children attending our camp,” said Brown-Ellis. “Most of our parents are working parents, so The Salvation Army Boys and Girls Club serves as a safe, educational and fun place for their children during the summer.”

In July, The Salvation Army Central Oklahoma will also offer a week-long residential camp at Camp Heart O’Hills in Tahlequah, a traditional outdoors summer camp. The camp is free to all enrolled.

Thanks to a partnership with The Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma, all camp attendees are provided breakfast, lunch and an afternoon snack at the day camp.

For more information about The Salvation Army Boys & Girls Club, contact Megan Brown-Ellis at 405-677-4781.

 Linda Day of Central Oklahoma had worked hard all her life, but she still wanted an engaging activity to enjoy when she retired.

She started making quilts, a relaxing hobby that she and her husband could both share, and those quilts were given to the Veterans Administration hospitals and nursing homes. Linda made quilts so well and so fast, she realized the organizations couldn’t take all the quilts she was making.

When Linda was younger and her children were small, she knew firsthand the difference The Salvation Army made in the lives of those in need. When her family faced a financial crisis and Christmas was out of the question, she turned to The Salvation Army, which provided her family with more than she thought possible.

Now, in a position to help others who are in need, she told her husband that she would start giving the quilts to The Salvation Army, and for the past two years, The Salvation Army Central Oklahoma Area Command has received more than 700 quilts from Ms. Day for the Christmas Angel Tree.

Ms. Day was one of hundreds of Salvation Army volunteers who gave so much of their talents and skills to The Salvation Army Central Oklahoma Area Command in 2011. She also received special recognition this morning at the Annual National Salvation Army Week Volunteer Appreciation Breakfast.

Although all our volunteers received certificates and thanks, a handful received special recognition for their outstanding contributions.

Boys & Girls Club:   Shana Perry  Principal Del Crest Middle School

 

Mrs. Perry has been an Advisory Council Member for The Salvation Army Boys & Girls Club of Greater Oklahoma for about 1 year. Her leadership in helping the Club host the Harlem Ambassador’s Charity Basketball Game enabled the Club to raise nearly $7,000.  She was instrumental in securing a venue for the event and handled most of the logistics for the night. She went above and beyond the call of duty to make things happen and the event was a success.

Her participation on the Advisory Council has been helpful to the Club staff. Whenever guidance and advice is needed, she is there. If it’s mentoring the kids that come to the Club, she is readily available. Mrs. Perry has a keen understanding of the environment that the Club kids come from and she understands what it takes for them to succeed.  She was recently awarded Middle School Principal of the Year and The Boys and Girls Club is proud to honor her as our 2011 Club Volunteer of the Year. 

Christmas Kettles  Rotary Club 29

The Rotary Club 29 began their support of the Christmas Kettle drive in 1943 under the leadership of Rex Hayes.  They started out as a small, but a powerful group of men and have grown to over 582 strong.  With the growth of the club also came growth of their support.  They now cover 14 kettle locations for an entire day during The Christmas Kettle season.  Rotary Club 29 has raised over $260,000 throughout the years.

Seniors Programs:

Citadel Senior Center’s Wanda McPherren teaches Bible study every Tuesday.  She is dedicated to God and to teaching his word to the people that attend her class.  She is faithful in her service and allows nothing to cause conflict with this commitment she has made.  Our members look forward to her class every week.

 

Reding Center’s Eva Zamora is a wonderful volunteer.  She is still active at 85 years young.  She speaks limited English but doesn’t allow this to be a barrier in her serving.  She faithfully wraps eating utensils, serves lunch and takes care of delivering meals to our homebound.  The Reding Center is a better place for our members with having someone like Eva.

 

Warr Acres Senior Center’s  Oma Bennett Nolan is a dedicated volunteer and always full of fire and life.  She is to do anything that needs to be done and always exceeds what is expected. Ms. Oma has a perpetual smile of joy, and her energy keeps the senior center hopping.

 

Shelter Programs:  Rebecca Marfurt

Rebecca’s first experience with The Salvation Army was at the annual bike assembly in 2009 when she helped assemble hundreds of bicycles for Angel Tree children.  At the time, she had been going through a difficult time of life, and she decided that volunteering would lift her spirits and bring her happiness.  After helping assemble bikes, Rebecca decided to look into ongoing opportunities for helping at The Salvation Army.  When she saw the garden area for the Family Shelter, it peaked her interest.

Rebecca has a love for gardening and creating a beautifl space at the shelter was an opportunity for her to share that joy with others.  It became her personal goal to make the entry to the Family Shelter inviting to whomever walked through the front gates.  She gardens during her lunch break and she takes pride in the beauty that is shared daily with all who enter.  “Volunteering for The Salvation Army has been far more rewarding than I could ever imagine,”  said Ms. Marfurt.

 

Social ServicesShannon Ballesteros

Since March 2011, one group of volunteers have provided thousands of hours and personal funding during 2011 by taking a “personal ownership” of the Social Services Department of The Salvation Army Central Oklahoma Area Command’s “Food Pantry.”

Although this is a family effort, Shannon Ballesteros took the lead, guiding her family in an effort to make the food pantry more efficient and organized. This family of volunteers began with that one vision and has since gone beyond what most volunteer groups can accomplish.

This group, compiled of seven volunters, has cleaned, sorted, built shelving, racks and carts, procured equipment,  totally re-organized the pantry,  trained others to be productive volunteers and solicited assistance from both area companies and individuals.

Ms. Ballesteros even used personal funds to purchase needed items that would have otherwise not been available. She can also be seen sorting and organizing the thousands of coats that are donated in the “Warmth 4 Winter” program.

Do yearn to make a difference in the lives of the less fortunate? Do you have talents and time you wish to share with others.

Volunteer today with The Salvation Army Central Oklahoma Area Command. Call our volunteer coordinator at 405-246-1101.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tickets are on sale and going fast for the Harlem Ambassadors celebrity basketball game April 23 at Del City High School in Del City.

The internationally-acclaimed Harlem Ambassadors will visit Oklahoma City for a game at on April 23 at Del City High School’s John Smith Fieldhouse, 1900 S. Sunnylane Rd. in Del City.

The Ambassadors will play against The Oklahoma City Lightning – a charity team featuring Oklahoma City’s favorite local celebrities and Coach Barry Switzer, to raise money for The Salvation Army Central Oklahoma Boys & Girls Club’s education, sports, recreation, character development and arts programs at the club.

The Harlem Ambassadors offer a unique brand of Harlem-style basketball, featuring high-flying slam dunks, dazzling ball-handling tricks and hilarious comedy routines. The Ambassadors feature non-stop laughs and deliver a positive message for kids wherever the Ambassadors play.

“At our shows, we want the kids to know that they’re part of our team too,” Coach Ladè Majic said. “We invite as many kids as we can to come sit on the bench, have a front row seat during the show, and get involved in all of the fun stuff we do.”

The Ambassadors set themselves apart from other “Harlem-style” basketball teams by working with local not-for-profit and service organizations and holding Harlem Ambassadors shows as community fundraising events.

For Oklahoma City’s event the Ambassadors have partnered with The Salvation Army Central Oklahoma Boys & Girls Club to help raise funds for the Boys & Girls Club programs.

Players on the Oklahoma City Lightning Team coached by Switzer include OU Football players, former OU stars, former NFL players, Rep. Richard Morrissette and local on-air talents.

“It feels good to be able to provide quality entertainment and create memories that the fans will take with them,” Moss explained. “We’re able to give even more when we can help provide funding for a Habitat for Humanity house or new computers for the school library, and that feels great.”

Tickets are $10 and available at The Salvation Army Boys & Girls Club, 2808 SE 44th.

A limited number of special VIP tickets are $20. Call 246-1100 for tickets today.

Sponsors include Love’s Travel Stop, eTech Solutions, Sandridge Energy, Unlimited Storm Restoration, Renda Broadcasting, Who’s Your Buddy Cafe, Oklahoma Natural Gas and OG&E.

Want to be a part of a fun event that features a national basketball program and The Salvation Army? Volunteer to help out during the Harlem Ambassadors vs OKC Lightening charity basketball game on April 23 at the John Smith Fieldhouse in Del City.

This energetic, entertaining event pits the world-famous Harlem Ambassadors against local celebrity players in a hilarious game that will thrill the entire family. All proceeds benefit The Salvation Army Boys & Girls Club.

The following volunteer positions are open:

Service Needed:

Ticket Sellers

Ticket Door Taker (adults)

Team Shop Seller (adults)

Concessions (adults)

Time Clock (adult)

Autograph session set up (adults)

 Hospitality Room (adult)

Dinner (adults)

Guest Greeters-Host

Programs Equipment/Supplies Runner for Megan

Runner for Tena

Runner for Myron

VIP ushers

Signage Volunteers-hanging signs

If you can help volunteer, please call Lois Green at 405-246-1101 or email at lois_green@uss.salvationarmy.org.

From Associated Press article:

A survey of Salvation Army youth programs in more than 80 cities shows more than eight in 10 programs saw increased demand from children and families in the past year as unemployment and funding cuts strained charities.

The survey released to The Associated Press found 56 percent of the charity’s youth programs – including camps, preschools, daycare and after-school programs – are operating at or beyond their capacity.

The report, “Growing Up in a Downturn,” also examined the Great Recession’s effect on youth programs since 2008. Since then, 41 percent of the programs have had to cut back services or close their doors because of insufficient funding. Sites in Los Angeles, Rockford, Ill., and Memphis, Tenn., were among those forced to scale back.

Salvation Army Commissioner William Roberts, the charity’s national commander, wrote in the report that the increasing demand shows parents across the country are facing daily questions about how to provide for their children when even social service programs have to make cuts.

“Should they spend their latest pay check on food or rent?” he wrote. “How can they spend time with their children while working two jobs?”

In raw numbers since 2008, attendance at Salvation Army daycare programs increased by more than 40,000 children. Overall, the charity has seen an increase in need across all of its programs. In 2010, it provided assistance to 30.2 million people in the U.S., compared with 28.9 million in 2007.

At the same time, giving to the Salvation Army has been strained in some hard-hit regions with the highest unemployment. Programs that had to cut back are serving 10 percent fewer youths than before the recession on average, the report found.

In 2011, a third of the charity’s youth programs saw a reduction in contributions. For another 31 percent of them, donations remained flat. The report says many programs will see similar pressures throughout 2012, even though giving to the Salvation Army’s popular red kettle campaign was up last year.

In Memphis, Tenn., a decline of about 15 percent in donations amounted to the loss of hundreds of thousands of dollars. Maj. Mark Woodcock, the area commander, said he had to close the doors of a subsidized childcare center that served low-income families for more than 30 years to focus on the most critical priorities of feeding and sheltering people.

In the charity’s women’s shelter with a capacity of 120 beds, 70 of them will go to children as a result of the ongoing economic slump, he said. So the shelter also provides tutoring and oversight to make sure those children attend school regularly.

“A lot of times people feel that the face of homeless is that man they see on the street corner,” he said. “Really the true face of homelessness is children.”

The Memphis chapter will be able to add more programs for children later this year with the opening of a $31 million Ray and Joan Kroc Corps Community Center. It’s one of 34 centers nationwide funded by a $1.6 billion gift from McDonald’s heiress Joan Kroc when she died in 2003.

Even with challenges, many of the charity’s youth programs had been able to redirect services and resources to meet growing demand, the report found. In some cases, they have expanded or opened new youth facilities during the downturn.

In Kerrville, Texas, youth services were maxed out at serving 43 students each day in after-school programs with a small facility in the town of about 23,000 people, said Salvation Army Capt. Brett Meredith. With the building of a new $32 million Kroc Community Center that opened in November 2010, it can serve 200 students daily with a complex that includes two pools, a fitness center, dance studio and gymnasium.

Even still, there is a waiting list for as many as 50 needy youth who want to join the center’s programs.

“The gift made all the difference in the world,” Meredith said. Without it, “we’d be the same place we were five years ago.”

This is the first time the charity has released its internal data on its youth programs. Officials said the report is meant to show the need for continued public support for children’s programs. The Alexandria, Va.-based Salvation Army ranks as the nation’s second-largest charity by contributions after the United Way.

Nationwide, Col. William Harfoot, the Salvation Army’s national chief secretary, said the increase in demand has been the most dramatic he’s seen in 35 years with the charity. Maintaining some youth programs that provide recreation and music or arts lessons, for instance, can prevent other problems like drug addiction and poverty, he said.

Most funding must be raised locally. Only a few national gifts, such as a $1 million donation from the Wal-Mart Foundation last year, are distributed to regional offices.

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Salvation Army: http://www.salvationarmyusa.org

Fun story when Channel 9 visited The El Reno Salvation Army’s Boys & Girls Club!

Road Trip El Reno: Morning Crew Visits The Boys And Girls Club – News9.com – Oklahoma City, OK – News, Weather, Video and Sports |.